Nassau Coliseum 1980: Revisiting the Show’s Length and All-Time Ranking

The glorious official release of the December 31, 1980 show from the Nassau Coliseum from the Springsteen archives now calls for a re-evaluation of the show’s length and its ranking among the longest-ever Springsteen shows.

That topic is of particular interest here, and was previously explored on this site in June of 2012, when Bruce was playing a remarkable series of shows in Europe, approaching his all-time records and finally, on the last night of the tour in Helsinki, cracking the four-hour mark.

The Nassau show had for years been regarded as the longest-ever (until July 31, 2012), and with the benefit of a complete recording running at proper speed, it can now be properly measured…and perhaps properly ranked.

Obtaining an accurate measurement:
The official recording of the Nassau show runs 3:47:21.  Applying principles previously explained here, the measurement of the show starts with Bruce’s first words to the crowd, “Are you ready to send out 1980?”  The set break (between “Thunder Road” and “Cadillac Ranch”) is not counted.  There are a few seconds left on the end of the recording after “Raise Your Hand” ends that also must be disregarded.

Accordingly, this site recognizes, for ranking purposes, that the length of the December 31, 1980 show is 3:45:53.

All-Time Rank:
The Nassau Coliseum show comes in ahead over the longest (non-Helsinki) Wrecking Ball shows.

The February 16, 2014 show in Melbourne, Australia – known for being the only High Hopes tour show to not be officially released – was 3:46:41, good for second-longest all-time.

Coming in just ahead of the Nassau Coliseum show is the December 19, 1980 show at Madison Square Garden.  The relatively new JEMS upgrade of the show – after the typical show-measurement methodology is applied – runs 3:46:20.

There is, however, the possibility that the tape from that show runs a touch slow which could throw the measurement off slightly.

Barring a definitive official release of the New York show to provide a perfect comparison, the top-5 length rankings are currently believed to be:

1. Helsinki, July 31, 2012, 4:04:47

2. Melbourne, February 16, 2014, 3:46:41

3. New York, December 19, 1980, 3:46:20

4. Uniondale, December 31, 1980, 3:45:53

5. Madrid, June 17, 2012, 3:45:32

 

NOTE:
A prior version of this post mistakenly omitted the Melbourne show from the rankings.  Thanks to T. for the correction.  This site regrets the error.

The Top Ten Shows that Bruce Springsteen Should Release from his Archives

In a live interview on Sirus’s “E Street Radio” channel on May 18, 2014, prior to the last show of the High Hopes Tour, Bruce spoke generally about his future plans, and mentioned potential archival releases of past shows. Today was the exciting first step in that process, with the introduction of a dedicated page on his website and the release of the Apollo Theater show from March 2012 prior to the start of the Wrecking Ball Tour.

Yet the interview that Brad Serling of nugs.net gave to Backstreets is what truly tantalizes, with the revelation that there is “a working list of 30 shows ‘spanning Bruce’s entire career’ under consideration” for release.

There were of course no shows specifically mentioned, but the interview with Serling offers a few clues, including his experience that some of the best selling archival recordings for other bands are the shows that fans have had in their collection for many years.

One final consideration, of course, is the availability of a sufficient quality copy of the show in Bruce’s archives. It is presumed here that this is not an obstacle for recent shows, which is likely one of the reasons why the Apollo Theater show was chosen as the first download: it was ready and available for release.  Material from earlier periods of Bruce’s career may not be as easily available.

With these considerations in mind, here’s hoping these are among the thirty shows under consideration, and among the first shows released:

The Top 10 Shows that Bruce Springsteen Should Release From His Archives:
1. August 20, 1981 – Los Angeles, California
The benefit concert for the Vietnam Veterans of America is well known as one of the most important and emotional perforamances in Springsteen’s entire career. It has been widely bootlegged, but none of the available recordings approach the high quality of other famous shows. An easy choice for #1.

2. November 16, 1990 – Los Angeles, California
The benefit for the Christic Institute featured Springsteen playing solo: not only on guitar, but – for the first time in many years – on piano as well. It was Bruce’s first public performance since dismissing the E Street Band and was the debut of four new songs, including “Real World.” This show, along with the following night’s performance, were reportedly considered as candidates for an official release in the 1990s.

3. September 24, 1999 – Philadelphia, Pennsylvania
For the fifth night of a six-show run during the Reunion tour, Bruce and the band moved across the street from the new arena to the old Spectrum, performing the night after Bruce’s fiftieth birthday. One of the best shows of that tour, but unfortunately no excellent recordings of the show have ever been available…yet.

4. August 23, 2008 – St. Louis, Missouri
Probably the best show by the E Street Band since they reunited in 1999. Memorable for the resurrection of numerous classic cover songs, including “Then She Kissed Me” and “Mountain of Love” as well as the band playing at peak power at the end of the Magic tour: the versions of “Gypsy Biker” and “Long Walk Home” from this show are definitive.

5. September 19, 1978 – Passaic, New Jersey
The “Piece de Resistance” show, and famously broadcast on WNEW-FM. It could be said that this show does not need an official release, given that it already exists in excellent quality in collectors’ circles. It remains one of the more significant shows in Bruce’s career, with the radio broadcast bringing many a fan’s first exposure to the E Street Band.  The LP, cassette and CD bootlegs of this show have been treasured by so many fans for so many years that it seems unfathomable that this show will not be included.

6. August 20, 1984 – East Rutherford, New Jersey
Well known under the bootleg title “The Last Great Show,” this was the final night of a ten-night homecoming stand at the Meadowlands Arena on the first leg of the Born in the U.S.A. tour. The Miami Horns and Little Steven were special guests, including on a memorable version of “Drift Away.” This show was one of the sources of the Live 1975-1985 box set and should be easily available for release.

7. March 25, 1977 – Boston, Massachusetts
The final night of a legendary four-show run to end a series of shows in which Springsteen was playing live because he could not record in the studio due to his legal battles with Mike Appel. Featuring a powerful “Backstreets” and “Higher and Higher” to end the show.

8. October 18, 1975 – Los Angeles, California
The fourth of a six-night residency at the Roxy Theater in West Hollywood. This show is the source of the now-famous version of “Thunder Road” that starts the Live 1975-1985 box set. Given the likelihood that the entire show exists in Bruce’s archives, this is a probable (and worthy) choice for inclusion in the series.

9. May 3, 1988 – Mountain View, California
Available for years under the famous bootleg title “Roses and Broken Hearts,” and widely considered the best show of the Tunnel of Love tour. A wild encore includes “Sweet Soul Music,” “Have Love Will Travel,” and for the first time in ten years, “Little Latin Lupe Lu.”

10. January 31, 1973 – New York, New York
Shortly after the release of Greetings from Asbury Park, NJ, Mike Appel made arrangements for this show to be recorded for King Biscuit Flower Hour radio program. Given the uncertainty of availability of early recordings of the band, this seems a likely choice as the earliest recording in the archive series.

 

Other strong contenders:

May 9, 1974, Cambridge, Massachussets
The show at the Harvard Square Theater reviewed by Jon Landau, resulting in a now legendary quote. The band was touring behind The Wild, The Innocent… and included David Sancious and Boom Carter in their lineup.

August 9, 1978 – Cleveland, Ohio
The famous “Agora” show, broadcast on Cleveland’s WMMS, with the band introduced by Kid Leo.

December 31, 1980 – Uniondale, New York
Still one of Springsteen’s longest-ever shows (even if since surpassed several times in 2012). This show was a source for Live 1975-85, Tracks and The Essential Bruce Springsteen and is certainly sitting in Bruce’s archives in its entirety.

May 8, 1981 – Stockholm, Sweden
Arguably the best show of the 1981 European tour, Bruce’s first extended visit overseas.

October 31, 1984 – Los Angeles, California
Halloween night includes a special “High School Confidential” opening skit and a rare performance of “My Father’s House.”

June 24, 1993 – East Rutherford, New Jersey
The “Concert to Fight Hunger,” at the end of the 1992-1993 World Tour; with guest appearances from Little Steven, Max Weinberg, Southside Johnny, and a roof-raising moment when Clarence Clemons comes out during “Tenth Avenue Freeze-Out.”

May 8, 2000 – Hartford, Connecticut
One of the consensus best shows of the Reunion tour, including Bruce dropping a part of “Honky Tonk Women” into the start of “Darlington County.”

June 28, 2003 – Milan, Italy
The final night of the European leg of the Rising tour, including a wild crowd, a thunderstorm and a rare performance of “Follow that Dream.” Specifically cited by Jon Landau at the time as one of Bruce’s best-ever shows.

October 4, 2003 – New York, NY
The final night of the Rising tour includes a rarity-filled setlist and a guest appearance from Bob Dylan.

November 19, 2007 – Boston, Massachusetts
Danny Federici’s last complete show with the E Street Band. (Alternate choice: April 22, 2008 in Tampa, Florida, the first show after his death).

November 8, 2009 – New York, New York
A complete performance of The River album, for the first and quite possibly only time. A stunning show, even beyond the album portion of the proceedings.

November 22, 2009 – Buffalo, New York
The final night of the Working on a Dream tour; a complete performance of Greetings from Asbury Park, NJ and Clarence Clemons’ final tour show with the band.

July 31, 2012 – Helsinki, Finland
At four hours, four minutes and forty-seven seconds, the longest Springsteen show ever performed.

High Hopes 2014 US Springsteen Tour Preview

The US leg of the 2014 “High Hopes” tour starts this Sunday, April 6, in Dallas, Texas. What does Bruce (possibly) have in store?

First Free Show Since 1973
Sunday’s show in Dallas will be the first time since the 1970s that the E Street Band has performed a full set that was completely free and open to the public.

There have been past free performances that had limited public access (such as the Apollo Theater show before the Wrecking Ball tour) or performances that were open the public but were less (often much less) than a full set.

Bruce and the band performed times in the 1970s at Colleges and Universities where the tickets were free to students but not otherwise open to the general public. The last known time a show was completely free and open to the public was on September 8, 1973.

With the exciting news that this show will be streamed online, one need not look so far in the past to find the last time that happened; it was September 21, 2013, the last show of the Wrecking Ball tour, at the Rock in Rio festival in Brazil. (Hopefully Bruce won’t do a full performance of the Born in the U.S.A. album this time).

 
Will songs from High Hopes ever make regular appearances in the setlist?
If the South African and Australasian shows are any guide, it appears that Bruce is treating the High Hopes songs much as he did the Working on a Dream songs, showing very little faith in them when creating his setlists.

“High Hopes” (the song) will be there every night, and “Just Like Fire Would” and “The Ghost of Tom Joad” will be on most nights as well. The rest of the songs are conspicuous by their absence: “Dream Baby Dream,” “Frankie Fell in Love” and “Hunter of Invisible Game” were only played once each; “This Is Your Sword” twice, and three songs from the album haven’t yet been played live this tour. Even “Heaven’s Wall” and “American Skin” were missing from several of the shows played this tour.

Then again, returning to the U.S. may give Bruce a bit more freedom to try his new material, as he may not feel obligated to play as many of his “regular” or “hit” material to crowds that haven’t had the chance to see him play as often. Further, this leg of the tour notably is playing to several markets that the Wrecking Ball tour missed, so there is the potential that those “new” songs may also make the set.


What about “album” shows?
Another factor that suggests a greater presence of new material is that Bruce should now at this point be completely finished with playing “album” shows. He is no longer playing for crowds that have had rare (or no prior) opportunities to see him in concert. There is simply no reason that he should have to resort to the gimmick that are full-album shows, particularly at the start of a tour behind a new album, and in the country where he plays the majority of his live shows.

 
Rock and Roll Hall of Fame Induction – Thursday, April 10
Next week, the E Street Band will receive the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame’s “Award for Musical Excellence” (formerly known as the “Sidemen” award). Of course Bruce will be performing with the band at the event. But what will they play?

Assuming a limited performance slot, the two most obvious choices are “Tenth Avenue Freeze-Out” and “The E Street Shuffle.” The former is what Bruce himself has described as the “story of the band” and of course has been used for two years as tribute to the members of the band no longer with us. The latter would be an appropriate choice of song to include Vini Lopez and David Sancious; indeed, Lopez played drums on the song at a show in September 2012.

A final consideration on the band’s song choices is that this may be the one time that the members of the band are given the opportunity to choose the songs played, rather than Bruce himself. In an ideal world, the band would be able to play each member’s signature song (“Racing in the Street” for Roy, “Two Hearts” for Steve, “My Love Will Not Let You Down” for Max, and so on) but time constraints would clearly not allow such a long set.

One further wrinkle is the question of who, if anyone, will be on stage other than the band members being inducted. It would be possible to limit the performance to only those being inducted – with David Sancious playing the keyboards instead of Charlie Giordano – but that would also limit the performance to songs without saxophone.

It further seems unlikely that Bruce would have just Jake on saxophone (rather than the entire horn section). Given that the event falls in the middle of the tour, it is more likely that the current incarnation of the band will be on stage in its entirety.  Including, of course, Steve Van Zandt or Patti Scialfa, in what could be their only time on stage with the band this spring.


Tom Morello replacing Steve Van Zandt (again)
As he did for the Australian tour of 2013, Tom Morello will be replacing Steve Van Zandt, while Steve is off filming episodes of Lillyhammer in Norway.

As evidenced by those ten shows in 2013, Steve’s absence is unlikely to affect the setlist choices, as Bruce played songs during those shows from almost every one of his albums.  The one possible exception is the song “Two Hearts.”  This was the song that Bruce played every time Steve guested on the Born in the U.S.A. tour, and was the song that was played every night on the Reunion tour, when Steve returned to the band.  It was absent in Australia in 2013, and returned to the set in Oslo, on Steve’s first night back.  It’s never been played by Bruce and the E Street Band without Steve on stage, so if it’s that one song you’re hoping to hear, you might be out of luck.

A reasonable analysis of Steve’s role in the modern E Street Band would indicate that his trademark vocals may be missed even more than his guitar playing.  Nils was called on by Bruce, in a manner similar to the Born in the U.S.A. tour, to join in on harmony vocals in Steve’s place but there is still going to be a clear difference.  Steve’s guitar parts, by contrast, were ably covered by Nils and Tom Morello in 2013.  Steve’s solos on more recent material such as “Living in the Future,” “Easy Money” or “Gypsy Biker” would probably require some practice to get right, although the issue is mostly moot, as Bruce regrettably seems to have little interest in playing those songs.


Patti Scialfa
Patti hasn’t played a full show with the E Street Band since September of 2012, and the number of shows she plays goes down on each successive tour.  She has, however, usually been present for the first US leg of a tour, so there is reason to hope that she may be able to make it more than just the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame induction.  She obviously will be missing the Nashville show, given the announcement that she’ll be performing at Sting and Trudie Styler’s Rainforest Benefit show that same night.

In the past, Patti’s absence has made it less likely that songs from Tunnel of Love or the song “Human Touch” would be played.  Recently though, Bruce has been relying on Soozie to cover Patti’s vocal parts on those songs, so performances of them are fortunately not completely precluded.


American Beauty
It is unprecedented for Bruce to release new original material while in the middle of a tour (excepting, obviously, the times when a tour started a few days prior to the release of the album it was supporting). Record Store Day is Saturday, April 19, and the band will be performing in Charlotte that night. Here’s hoping that Bruce chooses to debut one (or more) of the new songs from American Beauty at that show.

There is no need to wait for Charlotte, of course.  Bruce does have a long history of playing new songs live before they are released on an album (such as “Point Blank” in 1978, “Seeds” in 1985 or “American Skin (41 Shots)” in 2000).  It wouldn’t be a surprise if he tried some of the American Beauty songs as early as opening night in Cincinnati.


“Local” Cover Songs
There was a great deal of publicity regarding Bruce’s choices of “local” cover songs in South Africa and Australia, and they were obvious highlights of the tour. That said, it seems unlikely to continue in the US, and those hoping for a cover song from different band from Tampa or Raleigh or Columbus are likely to go away disappointed. The nature of the Southern Hemisphere leg, where the band did not fly home after each show and were on an extended tour together naturally lent itself to more time for pre-show practice and more time to come up with interesting ideas for each show.


Miscellaneous
Will the shows continue to be available as official downloads?
There’s no reason why they shouldn’t.

Will there be more shows?
Bruce’s tours are big business and there’s never before been a tour where he’s skipped his biggest markets in the US (for example, New York). At some point in the foreseeable future, he will be playing there again.

But when exactly?
Your guess is as good as mine.

Is this the tour where “Waiting on a Sunny Day” finally gets a rest?
It just might be. In a positive trend, it was absent from 5 of the 13 Australia/New Zealand shows.

What other live staples might get a well-deserved rest?
Hopefully “Dancing in the Dark” will take a break from the show for a while. It’s an intriguing possibility with the tour returning to a “familiar” market; Bruce may not feel compelled to play it for fans overseas that are seeing him for the first time.

Will the Tenth Avenue Freeze-Out tribute continue?
It was present in Australia in 2014, after having already been done there in 2013. It’s possible, but unlikely that it will be left out.

Will Bruce still be taking lots of signs from the audience?
I wish he’d tamp down on this trend. He could easily make an announcement through his website (or his newfound social media presence!) telling people that he’s not doing that this time around.

If he does still want to take signs, I do have a suggestion or two:

 


Dear Bruce: (if you’re at work)…

March 11, 2014

Dear Bruce:

Really enjoying your new use of instagram and the photos you’ve been posting to your website.

Yes, you just got home from a long tour and could be taking it easy.  But since the pictures were taken in your “workroom,” here’s hoping you are:

1. Figuring out how to work the new songs from High Hopes into the setlists for the upcoming shows.

2. Looking over your back catalog and considering some new things to play this spring (how about “30 Days Out?”)

3. Putting together the River box-set.

4. Arranging that new full-band version of “Real World” I suggested to you last year.

5. Listening to recordings from past shows and finding some favorites to use for the start of an archive download series.

6. Thinking about balancing your setlists with both your “classic” material – songs such as “Badlands” and “Born in the USA” and the best of your “contemporary” material – songs such as “Long Walk Home” and “Rocky Ground.”

7. Drafting new essays for an update to the Songs book (you’ve put out 6 albums since The Rising!)

8. Reading the latest issue of Backstreets and making sure we didn’t make any mistakes.

9. Mulling over that auto-biography you’ve had kicking around for a while.

10. Writing new songs!

They’re Here! Springsteen’s Official Live Show Downloads Now Available!

“Talk about a dream, try to make it real…”

And they have!  The day is finally here: one can download an official, high-quality recording of Bruce Springsteen’s live shows.  The E Street Band played in Cape Town, South Africa on January 26, 2014, and late in the evening of January 29, 2014 the first recording was made available – at the reasonable price of $9.99 for MP3 or $14.99 for FLAC.

Instant reaction:

It’s a good mix.  A nice balance of instruments, and a good amount of audience.  Maybe Bruce’s vocals are a little low, but this is the first time they’re doing this.  One imagines a little tweaking to the mix will probably happen over the first few shows.

Lots of little things can be heard in the mix that might get missed at some of the shows: a great guitar part by Tom Morello at the end of the “Death to My Hometown,” or the backing singers in “Out in the Street,” or the baritone sax of Ed Manion adding to the bottom end in “Spirit in the Night.”  Nice lyric change by Bruce in “Hungry Heart” to “…here I am in Cape Town again.”

(And that’s just from the first seven songs!)

Total Disaster as Springsteen Tries to Sell Recordings of Live Shows

UPDATE, JANUARY 22:

Today, Backstreets breaks more news on this subject, and it’s unequivocally positive:

“Backstreets has just confirmed that, in addition to the USB wristband sales model, Springsteen will also be offering direct audio downloads through his official Live Nation online store following each show on the upcoming leg, with no physical purchase required. There will be two options for audio formats: MP3 (320 kbps) or FLAC (Free Lossless Audio Codec). Pricing will match Pearl Jam’s, at $9.99 for MP3 or $14.99 for FLAC. Hard to say fairer than that.”

(Emphasis mine)

Needless to say, this is simply fantastic news, and largely addresses each of the issues raised below with Springsteen’s plans as originally revealed.  The original article remains below, with several parts of it now gladly moot.

Original Article:

Last week, Backstreets breaks the news that Bruce Springsteen is finally ready to sell official live recordings of his concerts, and he’s planning on doing so on his upcoming tour.  Jon Landau, Bruce’s longtime manager, is quoted:  “We’re trying to keep the surprises coming…I think we are.”

No kidding.

Today, the program is revealed:
1. Fans will have to buy a “wristband” with a USB drive attached in order to obtain the recording of the show.
2. For each wristband purchased, they can download one show.  Want 10 different shows?  You’ve got to buy 10 wristbands.
3. The downloads are only offered in MP3 format.
4. The cost: $40 per wristband, plus tax and shipping.

The only accurate characterization of this program is that is a massive blunder on the part of Springsteen, and shows a total lack of understanding of his fanbase and of technology generally.

The Price
The $40 price is so far out of line with the industry standard as to be baffling.  Pearl Jam charges $10 per show in MP3 format; $15 per show in FLAC format; $16.98 for physical CDs and $20 for FLAC-HD.   Similar prices are charged by Metallica.  John Fogerty.  Phish.

Plus tax and shipping.  That’s right, because the only way to get the recording is on the silly USB drive, a buyer has to also pay for shipping (minimum charge $8.95 on an item that requires about $2.00 of postage) in order to get the recording.

And the wristband?  A 2 GB USB drive is worth maybe $5.  Assuming the buyer even wants one.

Of course Bruce is free to charge whatever he wants for his music, as is his right as an artist.  As consumers and fans, we are free to call him out on it.  This is just greedy.

The Quality
MP3s are not “high-quality” audio.  This is not up for debate.  Advertising these as “high-quality audio recordings,” as listed in the store on Bruce’s official website, is insulting.

It’s perfectly fair to charge a different rate for MP3s and FLAC-HD, as the artists mentioned above do.  Offering MP3s only is stupid.  Why would Bruce not want his fans to be able to hear the music in the best possible quality?  It simply makes no sense.

The Wristband
The vast majority of people buying the shows do not want or need a wristband with a USB drive attached thereto.

If the shows are going to be downloaded from the internet, there is no sensible reason whatsoever to make it necessary to ship a USB drive through the mail in order to do so!  One wonders how much of the price could be reduced simply by eliminating this nonsense.

The Fundamental Lack of Understanding of the Fanbase (and Technology)
The takeaway here is that Bruce and/or his advisors, including Jon Landau, simply do not understand Bruce’s fanbase.

Official recordings of live shows is something that Bruce’s fanbase has been clamoring for for years and years.  There are tens of thousands of fans who want high-quality recordings of live shows who would be buying two or three or five or ten shows each if the price was fair and the format useful.  There are hundreds of fans (and possibly more) who would buy every single show of the tour if he was doing this properly.

$40 for MP3s and a pointless USB drive is just terrible.  One is left to wonder how something the fans have wanted for so long could have been implemented so terribly.

What to Expect on Bruce Springsteen’s “High Hopes” 2014 tour

Now that Bruce Springsteen’s new album High Hopes has been released, what can we look forward to on the upcoming tour?


Late Night with Jimmy Fallon
Tuesday will be Bruce’s fourth appearance on Late Night with Jimmy Fallon. Playing “High Hopes” is guaranteed. The second song is less certain, but the prediction here is “The Ghost of Tom Joad.” Presumably Bruce will also return in another comedy bit as well. I wouldn’t dare predict what is in store there.


Starting the Tour Overseas, in a New Market
With no rehearsal shows scheduled or expected, this tour will wind up as the first time in the Reunion era in which the core setlist is unveiled at the first show of the tour (January 26 in Cape Town). In the past, rehearsal shows — or defacto rehearsal shows, such as the Apollo Theater performance — have served as the first look at the basic set structure that Bruce will use.

Also new is that Bruce is starting his tour overseas. The only time the E Street Band started a tour overseas was the Reunion tour in 1999, but they did have two rehearsal shows in the US prior to doing so.

Further complicating things is that Bruce will be starting the tour in a market in which he’s never played. It stands to reason that the first night in Cape Town will resemble the shows Bruce played in Mexico City and South America last tour, with perhaps songs from High Hopes instead of Wrecking Ball. It would not at all be surprising to see Bruce choose to include the key songs from his back catalog (“The Promised Land,” “Prove It All Night,” “Thunder Road,” “Born in the USA”) in the South African shows rather than focusing on the new material. Accordingly, a true representation of the core setlist for the tour might not appear until Bruce reaches Australia.


How much material from High Hopes makes the set?
The early shows on each of Bruce’s recent tours have all included a large amount of new material. 11 of the 15 songs from The Rising were in the core setlist; 8 of 12 from Magic, and 7 of 11 from Wrecking Ball. Although many of the songs were almost immediately dropped, Bruce did even have 6 songs from the album in the set on the opening night of the Working on a Dream tour.

A similar number of new songs can be expected at the start of this tour. Some of the predictions are easy, as the E Street Band has already played several of the songs from this album live. “High Hopes” is a near-certainty for the first song of the show. “The Ghost of Tom Joad” is a definite, and “American Skin (41 Shots)” likely. “Just Like Fire Would” seems certain for the Australian shows, and may well turn up in South Africa (and elsewhere) too.

Bruce discussed playing “Heaven’s Wall,” “Frankie Fell in Love” and “Dream Baby Dream” in the interview recently broadcast on E Street Radio; they all seem logical contenders. I would expect these seven songs to be the “new” songs that are performed most often in concert.

It wouldn’t be surprising to see Bruce try “Hunter of Invisible Game” and/or “The Wall” at the start of the tour but it would seem only a question of time before they would be dropped from the show. In the past, the quieter and slower new songs (“Magic,” “The Wrestler,” “Jack of All Trades”) were all tried at the start of the tour but eventually dropped from the set. “Empty Sky” is the only recent example of such a song being played every night of a tour.


What’s the song that gets played once and only once?
History tells us that there will be one song from this album that will be played exactly once on the tour, and never again. It was “Let’s Be Friends (Skin to Skin)” on the Rising tour; “You’ll Be Comin’ Down” on the Magic tour; “What Love Can Do” on the Working on a Dream tour and “You’ve Got It” on the Wrecking Ball tour.

The prediction here is that this time, it’ll be “Harry’s Place.” There’s a lot of different sonic layers in the song that could be hard to replicate on stage (Morello’s guitar, the sax, the distorted vocal); the fact that the song’s time has arguably passed (Bruce has dated the song as commentary on the “Bush years” in America); and the “x-factor” that Bruce might be a little bit uncomfortable singing the expletives in concert.


Album shows?
One would think these are a thing of the past but they can’t entirely be ruled out either. With Bruce returning to Australian markets he played just one year ago, those cities may experience something similar to what happened in Europe this past summer. If one was hoping to hear a Born to Run and/or a Born in the USA album show, the stadium dates in Melbourne and the outdoor dates in Hunter Valley are the most likely candidates. It’s not very likely to happen, but certainly not impossible either. As always, the hope here is that Bruce doesn’t do them.


What gets played from Bruce’s other recent albums?
Not much, in all likelihood. One of the few disappointments of Bruce’s busy touring schedule is that with each successive new album and tour, he has generally ignored his other recent material.

On the Magic tour, only “The Rising” and “Lonesome Day” remained from The Rising as regulars in the set. Only “Radio Nowhere” from Magic showed up on the Working on a Dream tour with any regularity, and Magic songs have been sparsely played since. Essentially nothing at all from Working on a Dream was played on the Wrecking Ball tour.

“Death to My Hometown” and “Wrecking Ball” were the two songs from Wrecking Ball played most frequently and seem the two most likely to get played again. “Shackled and Drawn” probably has a shot too. Sadly, we’re unlikely to ever see “We Are Alive,” “Jack of All Trades,” “Rocky Ground” or “Easy Money” played live again in any meaningful quantity.


Does anything from the back catalog get retired for this tour?
Bruce is going to absolutely play “Dancing in the Dark” when he goes to South Africa, but the hope here is that he gives it rest thereafter.

It’s been in the set essentially non-stop since the very beginning of the Rising tour. It might be his biggest hit, but he has other songs that are just as well known and would work fine in the encore to give “Dancing” a well-deserved break.

After 2+ tours of the song being played every night, Bruce finally dropped “American Land” out of the show on the second night of the Wrecking Ball tour, and the song has made only occasional appearances since. One hopes he has the same good sense with “Waiting on a Sunny Day” on this tour.

It will be curious to see if Bruce elects to de-emphasize “Tenth Avenue Freeze-Out” on this tour. After being an every-night song and feature of the set on the Reunion tour, it made only four appearances on the Rising tour. A similar approach may be taken again on this upcoming tour.